Posts Tagged ‘uk’

I came across this festival via a pamphlet I got at the London Permaculture Festival last week and decided to help promote it, unfortunately the date of the event is just next week and is far too late for me to be able to even attampt to attend. I will now hopefully be able to book it for next year if possible …

This years event will be held between Thursday 10th to Saturday 13th of August 2017 and you can still book tickets on their website.

o g f 2017 ao g f 2017

Watching the video (3.5 mins long) this is definitely an event which is worthwhile to go to, I’m sadly going to miss the opportunity this year, it looks excellent especially for kids!

For those who are unable to watch the video or stream it for some reason, the following are some of the events and things to do at the festival based on last year’s video:

  • Archery,
  • Off Grid College,
  • Crafts and Tech area,
  • Well Being Area,
  • The Wildwood,
  • Off Grid Kids Area,
  • Live Music Barn,
  • Eco Build Demos
  • Organic Food and Drink,
  • Family Camping.

Another World Is Possible

Off Grid Festival Website (Click Here).

Other courses / talks on offer are:

New Economy – Permaculture – Eco-Build – 12v Technology (solar / wind power) – Bushcraft – Growing Food – Low-Impact Living – Land – Social Enterprise – Community Housing – Energy – Forest School – Conflict Resolution – Foraging & Wild Medicine – Yoga – Dance & Meditaion

Honestly, I’m contemplating faking a semi serious illness to get off from work now …. 🙂

I had a thought the other day, what am I doing wrong in terms of companion planting / sacrificial planting? (Sacrificial, meaning growing plants which you intend to attract pests away from your desired species / crops). The main result being that I always grow them too late! When Spring is approaching we just usually all take a look at our stock of seed packs or growing calendars to see what needs sowing / starting off early indoors (such as Cabbages, Onions etc.) But the one thing I am going to change this year is to have a few trays dedicated to the sacrificial plants, mainly Marigolds (Tagetes). I am using Phacelia (Phacelia tenacetifolia) as a Green Manure but am aware too that Bumblebees like the flowers so, I will be ensuring that a few plants will be grown seperately purely for the Bees and placed in various micro-climates around my gardens (place one group in full sun, another grouping in partial shade and this will ensure different flowering timings which will help the bees a lot in that their forage sources are spread out), do this with various plant species, include perennial plants, annuals etc.

tagetes

Marigolds (Tagetes) planted as sacrificials to ensure Pumpkins were left unmolested by Slugs – once they died, fresh seed was harvested for next years sowings

Marigolds have two main and a third benefit in our gardens, the first for me and most Organic farmers (small scale) benefit, is the sacrifical planting which attracts slugs and snails away from other young plants you are trying to get going in the early parts of summer, they love marigolds and will mostly go for those (violas and pansies are another plant that can be used as well).
Benefit number two is that Marigolds (Specifically Mexican marigolds) have aleopathic chemicals which suppress difficult perennial weeds such as Bind Weed, a piece of land can in theory, have this perennial weed eliminated with the correct method being used.
The third benefit is it’s Ornamental value and it’s aparrent attractiveness for Bees (after growing Marigolds for the last 3 years as sacrificial plants, I have yet to see a Bee specifically going for them), I keep seeing it mentioned on other sites online especially ones writing about Pollinator Attracting plants …

Start your Sacrificial plant sowings Now, as well as any other plants you wish to get going in your garden by seed which are either for the benefit of wildlife or perennial plants.

One trick I have learned about Marigolds is to let perhaps one set of true leaves form (the more mature leaves which will be differently shaped compared with the smaller baby leaves which come out on germination) and I then clip the top out above the first set of true leaves, I then immediately plant the tip in a small pot with damp compost and keep moist, these plants are very good for cuttings propagation, not a single one failed even though they were left right in full sun in moist compost).
Do the above for every one plant and you will easily double your population! so for example, if you decide you would like to grow maybe 40 -50 Marigolds per season. you merely need 20 – 25 starter plants to come up from seed which means one dedicated seed module tray!

Remember, as with all plants, the more you cut them lower down, the more the plant bushes out so instead of perhaps 2-4 flower heads from a mature plant, you will have lets say 5-9 flower heads and a more bushier / attractive plant, this should keep the plant lower to the ground which means more accessible food for the slugs and snails.
Once you buy one pack of Marigold seed, you should never really need to buy another pack as the seeds are easy to save, this is only unless you decide you would like to try another variety to compliment those which you already have.

In the next post, I will be writing about what can be sown now in preperation for the upcoming growing season, I will start off with January and get to February in the coming week…

I am in no way going to be benefiting from this financially, however, as an avid follower of Sepp Holzer’s Permaculture methods, I stumbled upon this excellent deal which, I unfortunately cannot take advantage of due to already owning Both books 😦

sepp-book-deal

Sepp Holzer’s Permaculture and Desert of Paradise – Huge Discounted Offer

The Books: ‘Sepp Holzer’s Permaculture’ and the equally interesting ‘Desert or Paradise, Restoring Endangered Landscapes using Water Mangement, including Lake and Pond Construction‘ are Both on a very good clearance offer for only £18.95 with free delivery for Both Books, this is a massive saving of £16.95 and just short of getting one of the books for Free! – on the website Green Shopping which stocks a wide range of books and magazines not only from Permanent Publications. Click here for the offer (Note, the link is likely to become unuseable once they stop the offer or sell out).

Are you interested in Permaculture, Organic Gardening, Wildlife Gardening, establishing a Rural self sufficient homestead or related? Then Get These Books! You will kick yourself in the future for not having taken this deal …

Here we have proof that the Forest Gardening method Does in fact work despite the skepticism that we Permies will inevitable experience from traditional ”Horticultural / Mono-cultural Society” types, in this 5 minute, well narrated and presented video, the land owner discusses his land and the project how it has come on since 1994.
This is a great video to watch to be able to understand the Forest Garden concept.


The main article where I came across this video is Here on the Permaculture News site, and below I have added a few images of the 7 basic layers of the Forest Garden concept:

7 layers

7 Layers of the Food Forest in Permaculture

Slide3-640x480

A Food Forest incorporating a Hugel / Swale combination

 

In this video the narrator explains how the owner (Michael Buck) built this small Cob house for only £150 which he rents out to a local farm worker whom only has to pay him with Milk from the farm, he didn’t use any power tools on the job and carried all of the straw for the roof on his back to keep it as a non polluting, eco project.

For more on eco homes such as Earthships, click Here.

Below I have added a list of Green Manures which will be sown to over winter so that first thing once spring is well underway, you will merely chop ‘n drop (Cut and either leave the foliage / stems on the soil surface or compost them), to get the ”Green Manure” effect.

Clover used as a Green Manure in an Orchard

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa): This perennial legume can be dug in after two or three months or left for one to two years; sow in April to July; good for alkaline soils. Nitrogen fixing may only occur if the seed is inoculated with nitrogen fixing bacteria prior to sowing.

Alsike clover (Trifolium hybridum): This perennial legume can either be dug in after two or three months or left in for one or two years; good for wet, acid soils; sow in April to August.

Bitter blue lupin (Lupinus angustifolius): This perennial flowering legume suits light, sandy, acid soils; sow in March to June and leave for two or three months before digging in.

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum): This half hardy annual will only grow in spring and summer best sown in April to August, it can be left for two or three months after sowing; grows well on nutrient-poor soils.

Crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum): This perennial legume is good for light soils; sow in March to August and leave in for two or three months up to flowering.

Essex red clover (Trifolium pratense): This hardy perennial legume overwinters well and can be left in for two or three months or for one or two years after sowing; good for loamy soils; sow March to August.

Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum): This annual legume will only grow in the spring and summer; it is unlikely to fix nitrogen in the UK.

Grazing rye (Secale cereale): This annual crop is good for soil structure and overwinters well; sow in August to November and dig in the following spring.

Mustard (Sinapis alba): This annual crop from the brassica family should not be followed by other brassicas, as it could encourage build up of the disease clubroot; sow in March to September and leave for two or three months before digging in.

Phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia): Later sowings of this annual crop may overwinter in mild areas, but it is generally best sown in April to August and dug in after two or three months; its flowers are very pretty.

Trefoil (Medicago lupulina): This legume can be annual or biennial and overwinters well but needs light, dry alkaline soil; it can be dug in after two or three months or left for one or two years after sowing; sow in March to August.

Winter field bean (Vicia faba): This annual legume can be left for two or three months after sowing (up to flowering) and is good for heavy soils; sow in September to November. (Use in place of Broad Bean [Fava Fava] as they are generally cheaper to buy).

Winter tares (Vicia sativa): This annual legume is hardy and overwinters well, even in heavy soils; sow either in March to August and leave for two or three months before digging in, or sow in July to September for overwintering.

Green Manure on a Farm (May be Phacelia tanacetifolia )

Green Manure on a Farm (May be Phacelia tanacetifolia )

Problems that may occur from Winter Green Manure:

  • A dense carpet of green makes a perfect environment for slugs and snails, so control measures may be needed after green manuring.
  • Decaying green manures can suppress plant growth, so allow at least two weeks between incorporation and planting or sowing.

Source: RHS Website

Last year’s survivors – A Plum, Apple and Cherry

I stumbled upon these accidentally last year 2013 when grocery shopping, I was skeptical at first as they were bare root fruit trees of various fruits and with my experience in purchasing bare root fruit bushes (which about 50% of the time were dead before I bought them), I decided to only buy two, plant them and if after one week the branches were still ”bendy” then I would go back and get more.
They were Apples, Pears, Cherries and Plums in ASDA for only £6 a pop!! Small varieties that, since they were root ball (meaning they don’t have a pot full of compost on the bottom, they instead have had their roots wrapped in water retaining material covered in plastic). (more…)