Posts Tagged ‘Permaculture Allotment’

I’m a little late with my current season updates this year, but anyway here we go…

 

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Giant Goosefoot ‘Magentaspreen’ Seedlings

One of the most ornamental Salad Greens I have on my allotment is the Magentaspreen Giant goosefoot, the centre has a beautiful magenta colour which shows up differently in photo’s, they are very similar to ‘Fat Hen’ aka Good King Henry (there’s such a thing as a good king? .. whatever).

I made the effort to keep some Phacelia to go to flower, mainly as they are very beneficial to various pollinator species but also because it is a Green Manure, it pays to let some go to seed to keep my own stocks up. Watching bumblebees visiting Winter and Summer Squash flowers can be quite ammusing, they seem to aim for the flower and just fall in, I don’t know if anyone else has ever noticed this, I noted this with quite a few bees on one particular day.

I still have a few smaller Borage plants still to open flowers, it seems like my self seeded patch is quite weaker / smaller this year, it may be that I have loads more going on at the Allotment this year that perhaps I am giving the dedicated wildlife flower section less attention.

I decided to allow the Broad Beans which were sown at the same time last year as my Garlic on top of the new Hugel / Suntrap to go to flower and seed (the intention was as a Green Manure where you dig them into the soil as you see them forming flowers) They made a nice addition to a stew we made. As an experiment, the Hugel / Suntrap has various support / companion plants sown on top with one Tomato, Sorrel, a couple Salad Burnet (Perennial) , Rhubarb (Survivor / volunteer) and two Asparagus crowns (these are purely to experiment, I obtained many crowns [20+] and can afford to lose two if all goes wrong).

 

Mid summer update coming up soon …

And so¬†I finally get around to posting ”what’s going on” photo’s of both my Allotment and Garden …

I love bees, but unfortunately with this year’s cool weather, I haven’t been able to get a nice photo yet compared with previous years, I do have a frog though ūüėČ

Click on each picture below for a larger image of such

 

Wildlife have increased both on the Allotment and Garden, mainly due to the added varieties of plants as well as ponds on both sites, I can’t stress enough how important a pond is, even if you just get a small container and place it in a hole with a few plants inside, it will go a long way to help the local ecosystem, not only that but can also create a Micro Climate which you can take advantage of in terms of Plant Variety and options …

Tadpoles are, Still Tadpoles! …¬†in the small pond at home, I’m leaning towards that maybe they don’t have as much food due to the pond size compared with the Allotment, so I’ve made a mental note to throw in a few more ”accidentally stepped on” slugs to help them along …

I’m growing Achocha for the first time this year, they are climbers so they are growing amongst the Pumpkins on the large trellis, they are related to the famous ‘Exploding Cucumber’ but the reason why I’m growing them is I feel like giving up on Peppers, the slugs are too Rambo here and this variety is said to taste like Green Peppers when fried – they are also a vine plant so a bit out of reach for the slugs.

The Japanese ‘Hokkaido’ Pumpkin are said to be one of the easiest Heritage (Heirloom) pumpkins to grow in the UK climate, are quite prolific and highly recommended as well as the Pumpkin Masque De Province.

I chopped down my Bocking 14 Comfrey literally 3 – 4 weeks ago and already have a plant almost two thirds back to the original size! You definitely need to divide the roots every year after the second year onwards … the crowns sell for reasonable money online so keep that in mind! I am pondering opening an online shop here, this will be something on offer if I go ahead with the idea.

Above are the photo’s from the Allotment plot, starting with a nice sunrise sometime perhaps after 6am? Once cloud, wow, amazing for the UK skyline eh?

The wildflower bed is¬†doing better now than I had expected (I really waited very late to buy and sow a pack on that dedicated bed) luckily all worked out fine, I suspect maybe less than half of the varieties mentioned on the seed pack germinated so I was quite happy with what came out. The Borage flowers are beautiful aren’t they? No wonder they are used in salads for a visual touch!

The¬†Pumpkin¬†is another French variety¬†Galeuse d’Eysines which I had some reasonable success with last year, it climbs well and does pretty good in storage

I placed Marigolds ‘Tagetes’ too late ( well I discovered that Marigolds really should be the First plant you germinate before you start sowing vegetable seeds – this is a personal observation, but I bet not my own) and hence lost a Pumpkin and Courgette plant to slugs, the other marigolds under my Achocha plants almost got completely decimated (that’s their purpose anyway) but are coming back to life now, their new purpose is ornamental¬†to brighten up the plot¬†and finally to provide me with seed for next year

The Water Mint ‘Mentha Aquatica’ are now flowering, they are insect / Bee beneficial and if you look closely in the photo, you can see¬†a resident Frog¬†on the left near the flower right in the emergence zone at the water line.

Till the next Garden / Allotment update – most likely a Harvest Update but there might be more ”mid summer” if we suddenly get good hot weather so the plants can get a boost

Allotments in Europe can best be described to those in other parts of the world as similar to community gardens, with the emphasis on that each individual gets a designated plot (if available) to grow primarily, healthy food for themselves and family.
This is not restricted to food growing, at least not in the UK that I am aware of, I have seen plots dedicated almost 100% to growing certain tree / shrubs which are good for weaving and others where the owner (tenant) just wants a small shed with some kind of cooking devices, seed storage, sitting area and a kettle to make tea or coffee with a garden mostly covered in ornamental flowers and plants.

Within the UK, interest in allotments surges during economic recessions etc. often causing dismay when people find out there is a 10 year waiting list for one in their area!


Allotment numbers in Europe are as follows (Source: allotmentphotogallery.com):

Germany 1.4 million allotments
United Kingdom 330,000
The Netherlands 240,000
Denmark 62,120
Sweden 51,000
Belgium 42,000
Austria 38,000
Switzerland  27,000
France 26,000
Finland  5,000
Norway  2,000
Malta 50

In countries like Denmark and England, allotment gardening can be traced back as far as the 1730’s, whilst the rest of Europe started joining in around the 1800’s onwards till today with Malta starting 50 allotments in April 2011. In Germany, the largest provider and user of Council / Municipal supplied allotments, the land used for the 1.4 million allotments accounts to 470 square Kilometers !

Click HERE for Quick Tour of Britain’s Best Allotment Winners Plot 2015 (Video)

Click HERE for a previous post of an Allotment site in Bristol which is managed by Mike Feingold, an old school Permaculturist (Video Tour / educational)

”Far more valuable than growing vegetables, … is my sanity, I can be here, and I have no awareness that I’m in the middle of inner city East Bristol, I’m on planet Zog here … and that’s incredibly valuable”
– Mike Feingold, UK Permaculturalist and Allotment Manager

For our overseas friends, Allotments are small areas of land which each council sets aside for interested members of the public who would like to grow their own vegetables, for rent. History of UK Allotment culture can be found by Clicking HERE.

Certain senior allotment holders can become committee members and there will always be at least one Allotment Manager. from the limited video’s or info I have seen about Mike and this allotment site, it seems to be that the whole site is set in a very close knit community / permaculture setting.

Things discussed are: Bed profiles, fruit trees, leguminous deep rooting plants, water retaining plants (Good for wildlife), early flowering plants (good for the pollinators), Winter crops, uses of cardboard etc.

enjoy: