Posts Tagged ‘Allotment’

One great way to control Aphid in your garden or vegetable patch is to encourage Ladybirds, there are a couple methods and probably the best guaranteed one is to find trees / plants which aphid go for in serious numbers, Linden ‘Tilia cordata’ or Lime tree as it is wrongly known as is a great example, they get covered in Aphid every yea and subsequently attract ladybirds, you can collect ladybirds and their pupae into small bottles to spread around your garden or you could order them online! Another method is to research which umbellifer wild flowers are native locally and plant a mixture of them, umbellifers are plants which have flat clusters of small flowers which are often umbrella shaped, these usually attract aphid and result in Ladybird and hoverflies coming in to look for food! Often ants fight off the ladybirds, one method to distract the ants is to have a sugar water source nearby …

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Organic Pest Control by Encouraging Nature – Permaculture Allotment

Keep in mind, only release ladybirds in the evening and it helps to spray your plants with water as this will dissuade them from leaving right away however, if you place them in the day by hand directly onto a plant covered in Aphid, they usually start chomping immediately.

Store them in their bottle (with breathing holes and some leaves / twigs inside) inside the fridge if you cannot get them in place the same day …

The above photo is of two newly ‘hatched’ ladybirds hence why they are only orange at this stage, going back to my allotment the next day I saw the plant already had at least 50% less aphid just within 24 hours!

Today I had a short watering and planting session and can confirm that companion planting potatoes around a french bean tipi delivers good foliage and healthy plant results! If I remember, I will do my best to weigh the resulting potato harvest – Beans are natural Nitrogen Fixers and they help feed nearby plants in a symbiotic relationship (The potatoes will deliver a ground cover and reduce moisture loss).

Further, small frogs are leaving the pond and again I harvested 1 large and 3 smaller Courgettes (Zucchini) from only two dwarf bushes! I am on a mission this year to be sure to keep harvesting them when small to see how much yield I can get from those two plants, I have germinated two others to be able to possibly pickle their yield for winter use. The dry weather is actually a welcome! I have had far less slug and snail damage this year when compared to previous years …

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Below is a list of what can be sown indoors, outdoors or in greenhouses and polytunnels during the months of March and April, this is for the UK / British Climate but can still be relevant in some other parts of the Northern Hemisphere

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During April 2017 we had a last minute frost which decimated at least 40% of my seedlings in the Polytunnel on the allotment, even though I got in there after work to shut the door and ventilation – my mistake was when I gave them a quick drink (this froze and killed them).

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Between Middle of March and April, most of your Spring sowings should have been started. Of-course it also depends on where exactly you live, but this is the average dateline for most of Britain.

Outside (depending on weather and soil conditions)

  • Root crops such as carrrots, parsnips, beetroot and turnips
  • Mangetout & podding peas & broad beans – probably better started indoors to avoid pests
  • The first sowings of summer salads including lettuces,radishes, cress, endive, & rocket,
  • Brassica crops for eating this summer & also through into the winter – kale, brussels sprouts, purple sprouting broccoli, summer and (early) winter cabbages,  calabrese and cauliflowers
  • Leaf Beets as well as swiss chard
  • Leeks
  • Radishes and spring onions
  • Some Green Manures are good to scatter sow now so they can be ‘chop n’ dropped’ in time for Summer plants such as Pumpkins, Squashes and Tomatoes when they need planting

Indoors

  • If you have slug or weed problems, then you may find all of the brassica crops, leeks and salads do better started in trays/modules and then planted out when they are better able to withstand them.
  • Similarly broad beans and peas may have to be started indoors if you have trouble with mice
  • Any companion / sacrificial plants such as Marigolds,

In trays or pots somewhere warm (germinator/warm airing cupboard etc).           Bear in mind that they will need somewhere warm & light to grow on

  • Tomatoes, peppers and aubergines, ideally by the end of March.
  • Celery/celeriac (again need heat to germinate)
  • Courgettes, squashes, cucumbers and melons (but not too early, or they will get too large before the weather is good enough for them to go outside)

In a greenhouse / polytunnel in the ground

  • Summer salads
  • French beans for an early crop
  • Herbs such as coriander, basil & parsley

Remember, to come back to this page easily you can just click on the ‘Monthly Sowing Calendar’ tab on the home screen.

 

 

I just wanted to say that with only a few years under my belt growing Onions, I can personally claim that Onion from seed (Preferrably from a good Heritage seed supplier) does far better than from sets (mini bulbs pre-grown to a small easy-to-handle size).

Yes, onion from seed are (or at least Seem to be) quite finniky / delicate to handle but Don’t let this put you off! The results are far better in my opinion.

Onion seed vs sets

Heritage Onion from Seed (LEFT) vs Commerically Available Onion Sets (RIGHT)

Take note that in the above photo, I grew Two types of Onion set and both were just as bad in terms of bulb swell and overall failure (Red Karmen and Stuttgart)

Why do (did) I still grow Onion from sets if I seem to have such better results from seed? Because this was my first proper season from start on my ‘new’ allotment and I came across a good deal in Lidl I think it was, for a bag of around 100 bulbs it was something ridiculous like $0.69p. So I decided to do a comparison test since I now have a much larger space to play around in.

Pros and Cons for both parties (Pro’s highlighted in Bold):

  • SETS:
    Can be contaminated with fungal growth or spores from storage or the production facility,
  • Most (probably 50-80% in my experience) didn’t get much larger than the little bulb that went in! (Don’t throw them away, make pickles!),
  • Need netting in the first weeks to prevent birds etc. from pulling them out before they establish,
  • Will need constant watering until they establish,
  • Are convenient if a Gardener is overwelmed with small seedlings on all available windowsills etc,
  • Save on plastic pots and compost,
  • SEEDS:
  • Are quite delicate when small,
  • Need one pot and compost per plant (or group of plants if following Multi Sowing),
  • In one year I had all of my onion seed attract aphid really early (February / March if I remember correctly?), however, that was well before I found out how to control them,
  • Have a much more well developed root system and romp away shortly after planting,
  • Swell up quicker too,
  • Far more disease resistance when compared,
  • Better options to choose from (such as storage length, taste, size etc.),
  • Establish quicker so need less tending,
  • Do not need netting,
  • Higher bulb-swell success rate as per observation (larger bulbs),

This is something I have been meaning to write about for quite some time now, in my travels across the capital I am constantly reminded bout these great ideas including sometimes at properties I see during my working hours! Can you imagine how much nicer our cities and living areas would look if a large majority were covered in Living Green Roofs?

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I have, in the past written an article on Eco Friendly buildings, here I am concentrating on Green Roofing at our homes or existing buildings, some people even create smaller ones on top of their bin sheds which are merely a few feet across and wide!
Although this is not a top priority right now for me (With all of my current projects ongoing), I will hereby make a pact that I will create at least one in my small garden on my rented property as well as one larger one (probably on top of my shed) on my Allotment (What is an Allotment?)

Examples of Green Roofs in a Modern Building Setting:

According to the London Wildlife Trust, London itself loses around ”Two and a Half Hyde Park’s” Sized worth of Green Urban Habitat and Forage ground due mainly to Hard Surface Landscaping in front and back gardens across the capital – one small way to revert and give back even just a little is to Create a Green Roof on part or even the whole of a building on the specified property.

Structures such as Bin Sheds, Wood Pile Roofs, Garden Sheds, Garages, Outdoor Rooms, Office Blocks, Houses and even part of your Conservatory can be adapted to a Green Roof Structure!

Some Other Examples:

Things to Consider before starting a Green Roof, and further comstruction information:

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All Information Below is obtained from The Green Roof Centre’s Website

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Extensive green roofs which are designed not to be trafficked and are therefore relatively undisturbed, can offer a very
good habitat for plants, birds and insects. There is evidence throughout Europe, that with the right design, green roofs
can encourage ground nesting birds such as lapwings, skylarks, oystercatchers and plovers.
Green roofs are able to create a “green corridor” through an urban environment helping the movement and dispersal
of wildlife.
– greenroofcode.co.uk
Other Links and Resources / How To:
Permaculture.co.uk Article 1

I accidentally let a Courgette (Zucchini) get to Marrow size, although I sometimes do this, I so far haven’t let any go past the 1 kg mark, the harvest from last week yielded a Marrow that is sitting somewhere at the 1.85 kg mark!! We still have yet to open it and see if it has gone to seed, if yes are they woody yet? if not, is it soft and still edible? I have seen a recipe online for Stuffed large Courgettes which I would like to give a try …

25 Runner Beans ‘Czar’, 35 Tomato ‘Millefleur’, 2x Italian Vine Tomatoes and the Courgette-Zilla with it’s normal sized cousin. The Millefleur tomatoes are really delicious straight from the bush, this variety will be a mainstay from now on for me.

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Regrets I have, as usual are that I again had plants germinated which I didn’t get in the ground or at least re-potted soon enough, they went to waste and this harvest could have included a good bowl full of various leafy greens for a nice salad … perhaps even an Aubergine or two if I had made good effort to get my polytunnel finished at least two months ago.

In the above photo’s you can see the prolific fruiting of the Tomato ‘Millefleur’ variety, we have had a pretty weak summer this year and I suspect that this variety will do much better in hotter summers.
I am very, very chuffed to say that I Finally got a Watermelon forming, the little ball really expanded quite a bit in the last day or two since I first spotted it (there looks to be another forming on one of the other plants too 🙂
Since it is so late in the season to even think of the watermelon doing well at all, I just need to get the polytunnel finished and work on adding heat mass temporarily into the tunnel to counter the inevitable cold nights that are very close around the corner -by heat mass I mean large rocks / bricks etc to absorb the sun’s radiation during the day to release slowly at night, the Watermelon Variety is bred for a short season so hopefully by October it can be harvested
One or two flowers from the one surviving Melon seem to be selling too so hopefully something is going on there as well …

It was a clear day (mostly) and everything in the pond was highly visible almost down to the bottom, my Oxygenating plants have grown so much I can start selling them in small batches now (the Water Mint is also sending shoots out in every direction, looks like I may have to sell a pond starter package online?), today I spotted the regular frog then suddenly a smaller one popped out from the same hiding place!

The pond has been swamped with Water Skaters, I saw two who found a lonesome Woodlouse to munch on. Today I managed to add some Onions into my last outdoor sowings of Carrots (the Carrots were seeded about two weeks ago – the Onions were placed where seeds failed to Germinate), planting a few Onions between and around your Carrots will confuse Carrot Root Fly – for those of you who are new to this, it’s called a few names worldwide – most commonly, Companion Planting or Intercropping.

I planted these onions knowing it is too late for them, but two things could happen here;
1: They will be a reasonable size once they need pulling out, so can be used as Salad Onions or
2: If small enough, they can be lifted to be stored to dry out, then I can use them to start early in my polytunnel for large Spring time Onions
3: They will survive at least most of the length of the Carrots’ life, so they will have fulfilled their purpose if they only provide the distracting scents

The Globe Artichokes ‘Cynara cardunculus’ a non edible variety of Globe Artichoke which is used mainly for ornamental reasons, are doing well it seems. All three are sending out fresh shoots including the one I planted in the very beginning (About 4 month’s ago when I got granted the land) -the most recent ones are scavenged from another plot which is vacant, I don’t want to find out that new tenants thought it was a weed and decided to kill them off …

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I must apologise for my regular followers for not being active on this blog over the last few months, I was granted an Allotment by my council and as I received it quite late (March/ April), being close to planting season, I had a lot of work to do to get the plot into a reasonable state and hence, most of my free time has been there. I will in the future, share the design on what I did and am doing on the plot.

It’s been unfortunately, an awful summer in regards to sunshine / warm days and temperatures here in the UK, after going outside today for a mini harvest and finally harvesting my First courgette for the season! plus some runner beans, I have made a couple observations which may be something to keep in mind with these weak summers we seem to be experiencing lately these last few years…

1: Since we had a very wet start, slugs were a huge problem this year, I realised a little too late that ideally, the plant that should probably be germinated first (if you have the space to bring them on until planting out) should be your marigolds (Tagetes) as well as any other ‘Slug Magnets’ such as perhaps Pansies and Violas (both related) – give your slugs and snails a multi buffet and there is a higher chance they will leave your seedlings alone.
Ideally, and I do stress this as I have now experienced and can confirm the huge benefit of having a Pond in your garden for the purpose of Frog habitat. This is my first year with a pond both in my Allotment (Did I mention yet that I now have an allotment?) as well as at home, I noticed a huge difference in slug / snail damage due to this.
Perhaps plan to germinate a few more plants of each of the species you noticed were devastated by slugs and snails this year during next years germinating season

2: Looking at the site today, I can recommend to anyone in the UK if you haven’t done so yet, cut off any new flowers on your tomatoes and as well as the growing tips now, I cannot see any chance of new flowers producing any sizeable fruit which would ripen in time, honestly this is even a little too late to say this but I had some hopes the weather would improve, unless of course you have a good site which gets 10 or more hours of sunshine a day then you could take a risk …

3: Start preparing early for winter crops, I highly recommend growing salads, kales etc..for winter harvest or early Spring harvest – I have built my second Polytunnel with experience through trial and error from my first polytunnel (partially from scavenged poles/ bits from first tunnel and nice large planks from raiding a construction skip) I will at some point post the design for you to follow, you can now start scavenging from skips (Construction Dumpsters) for free timber, plastic PVC conduit pipes etc. if you want to build a polytunnel as a DIY project.
I do recommend building them as DIY projects as in permaculture, we try our best to reuse and repurpose / recycle whatever we can, also, most polytunnels although great in size, have a zip roll up door and these are very unreliable!! rather make a door with hinges on a design like mine.

4: This is the second year of making Comfrey Compost Tea from my one Comfrey (Bocking 14) plant, these plants get really – really huge in the second year and are a very important addition to the vegetable garden, one plant should suffice but if you have the space, go for a second if needed! My plant completely smothered my fruit bush bed (Raspberries, Loganberries, Red Currants, Strawberries and Gooseberry) I ended up having to chop the whole plant again after making the compost tea twice already, the plant practically filled my 300 ltr compost bin.
I left the plant to expand as it did because due to the weak summer, this was the only plant supplying the bees with a good reliable source of nectar – proving how invaluable perennials are in any system, not just a permaculture system…
If you are going to obtain the Bocking 14 variety (bred / selected for the traits of non self seeding and great for being a biomass source which can be chopped several times a year), be aware you will need to control the root crowns by chopping (dividing with a spade) once every year after the first summer (if in an urban garden etc)
Note: In the near future, I may include an online shop section on this site, I will most likely sell Comfrey bocking 14 Crowns so keep an eye out if you are in the UK or Europe

5: This is the first year that I started collecting leaves in summer … sound a bit weird? well, Evergreen trees actually do shed leaves, in spring / early summer, evergreens shed their older leaves once newer growth has already pre-placed it, after emptying one of my compost bins prematurely, I needed to start filling it again ASAP, every week or so I took the time to visit the same places near my workplace as well as home to fill some smaller bags with these brown leaves to counter all of the fresh greens (including all veg and fruit scraps) that goes into the average compost bin weekly during summer.
Both of my compost bins (one at home and one on the allotment) started freshly emptied in the early summer, but with collecting browns as much as possible weekly from evergreen shedding, both bins are practically half full and I do not collect grass cuttings to fill them with as most home owners do! …

6: Now is a great time to make a deal with your local tree surgeons to dump a load of woodchip for you – woodchip at this time has leaves included in the mix and this helps decomposition, have an area in your garden / site where you can bag up all of the chips and let sit for next year, be sure to moisten it and mix in a little bit of soil  / compost or manure. Newly cut woodchip will cause ‘Nitrogen Lock’ which depletes the nitrogen from your soil, hence why it’s best to bag it up and let sit for 6 months or a year before applying. If your intention is for creating /covering walkways then this will not be needed and you can practically lay it down immediately.

7: Please Please learn new things, don’t be scared to go against the norm! Don’t feel embarrassed if someone gives you advice if they haven’t been into gardening or growing food as long as you have!
With the advent of the internet, many young motivated individuals (also older ones) are amassing much knowledge from the countless hours they are and have been spending online researching. I am referring to the old guys who have had plots on my allotment site for well over 10 years now (think of how many more thousands of people there are countrywide just like them?) , although they are quite nice people and often listen to what I advise, they simply cannot follow any of it! We have one guy who’s plot gets flooded basically every year and still refuses to build raised beds despite other plot holders just a few plots away demonstrating the benefits of raised beds – he perpetually loses crops and has developed a regime of multiple seed sowing in the greenhouse at home to counter the problem …
Then there’s the guy who practically Carpet Bombs his plot every day with slug pellets (would you like some beans with that formaldehyde sir?) despite knowing about frogs, beer trapping and laying plastic sheeting down as a habitat to catch them under. He also still went out and bought a few bottles of Tamorite Fertiliser Liquid after I pointed out that there are many comfrey Bocking 14 plants on some old derelict plots where there are no tenants – And explained how to make comfrey tea to him in detail, which he showed a huge interest in. Consumerism is a cancer on these people I feel

Over the last few years, I have been quite interested in observing how some buildings especially large warehouses in Industrial Estates have such huge roof space and all that it is used for is mounting a few air conditioning units!
With the improvements in Solar Cell technology (including wind turbines), surely if at least 50% of all larger buildings in Estates such as these as well as Shopping Malls, Schools etc. were to be fitted with Photovoltaic Solar Panels then we would see a massive decrease in the need or reliance on polluting fossil fuels as well as Nuclear ! ?

City Square Mall Singapore, Rooftop includes Solar Panels, Green Living Plants and Rainwater Harvesting!

City Square Mall Singapore, Rooftop includes Solar Panels, Green Living Plants and Rainwater Harvesting!

I completely agree that renewable energy is not something we can 100% rely on just yet, but slowly phasing out the need for these other primitive and environmentally destructive forms of energy until we gain the know how to become 100% reliant on renewables, is definitely something that needs to be done as a priority worldwide. Click Here for the Article on City Square Mall (Above Photo) in Singapore.

Solar Panels on an IKEA Superstore

Solar Panels on an IKEA Superstore

This is not entirely restricted to energy production, there is also food production as an option and this is becoming more popular worldwide! In England and also in many other countries, local authorities provide plots of land for rent to local residents at a rental fee (per year) which they can use to grow their own food, host a few bee hives etc. even just to be able to garden … Unfortunately, they cannot provide enough of these plots (Called Allotments in the UK) and some councils are selling them for private development! Not only this but running your own little plot on an allotment site also requires you to have reasonable transport options, many people do not own cars and also allotment sites can be too far from ones home.

Rooftop Gardening may help alleviate this problem:

Note: I read somewhere a few years ago that New York is estimated to have enough roof space to feed 15 Million people! I do not know if this is on an annual basis calculation but if I ever come across the study I will most definitely post it here as an article with a link!

Eagle Street Rooftop Farm in Greenpoint, Brooklyn (NY).  20 June 2010. Photo: Antoine Doyen

Eagle Street Rooftop Farm in Greenpoint, Brooklyn (NY). 20 June 2010. Photo: Antoine Doyen

rooftop farm New York

rooftop farm New York

Rooftop Farm - Brooklyn Grange NY

Rooftop Farm – Brooklyn Grange NY

Rooftop Farm - Brooklyn Grange NY 1

Rooftop Farm – Brooklyn Grange NY 1

Rooftop Farm - Location Unknown

Rooftop Farm – Location Unknown

Rooftop Farm Antwerp, Belgium

Rooftop Farm / Garden, Antwerp, Belgium

Stacey Kimmons and Audra Lewicki harvest lettuce at the Chicago Botanic Garden's 20,000-square-foot vegetable garden atop McCormick Place West in Chicago.

Stacey Kimmons and Audra Lewicki harvest lettuce at the Chicago Botanic Garden’s 20,000-square-foot vegetable garden atop McCormick Place West in Chicago.