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I think I saw this documentary around 2012, this is definitely the most well-researched, informed and put together documentary regarding the evidence that Cell phone / Mobile Phone, Wifi, RF and other Emf transmission technology Does In Fact have a pretty severely negative effect on most living organisms including us.

This is not the documentary that you should save to watch later, you need to see this now and share it with as many contacts as you can ! ! !

With 5G being sneakily brought into our societies around mainly the western world behind our backs, this is only going to get worse, 5G ‘technology’ is far more harmful and powerful than anything that came before it, it is also designed to work over short distances and so, they will be installing the antennas all over. In the UK it has been exposed by insiders that the 5G antennas have been included in LED street lights that have recently been installed by many Councils – soon you will not have to worry about the large mobile phone mast a few hundred meters from your house as you will have 5 you can see right in your street from your front window!!

Click on the slide and play the below video from the 42:25 mark until 42:41, this is precisely what I have been saying for years regarding scientists and whim they work for / where the funding comes from.

If your council has recently put up new LED lamp heads on your older street lamp posts, try see if you can see an antenna on top (Usually a short black stick-like antenna) this means they have placed the 5G technology into government property without our consent .. ie: you and I are paying for this so that large corporations can earn billions whilst we get adverse health effects but hey, at least we will have super-fast Wifi right???

The documentary in numbers:

Over the last 25 years, 5 butterfly species have become extinct in Britain, 36 species of Australian Shore birds have decreased in numbers by 75%, 50% decline in all European Grassland Butterflies, Bee numbers have dropped by about 70%, Half of all known British butterfly species are under threat of extinction, 62% of Asian waterbirds Declining or Extinct, 4 species of American Bee have declined by 98% … the list goes on.

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Crazy day (yesterday), 4am wake up, check outside (rain / wetness status) and prepare seed trays for final crops that are able to be sowed in July, go to work and finish an our later than normal … come home, eat and get busy in the kitchen!
So last night I made the Banana Loaf and followed it up with a few jars of home made Chutney, it’s been a good while since I made a Chutney and I only did it as I had more than a Kilogram of foraged red plums that were harvested before ripening, they are a bit too tart to enjoy as they are and I was running out of my last couple home made chutneys from previous years …

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For now, here is the Banana Loaf recipe, I might only share the Chutney recipe at a later date as it was also an experiment and I will need to age the Chutney for at least one month before I can do a taste test.

If you have never made a cake before, this is a great beginner recipe with only 5 ingredients!

Banana Loaf:

3x medium or 2x large very ripe bananas,

250g self raising flour,

120g Sugar,

2x Eggs,

125g Butter, cut into small pieces at room temp

1x Greased Cake Loaf Tin (I usually use a small amount of Olive Oil for the greasing)

Method:

Mash the bananas in a bowl with a fork or back of a spoon, now add the butter together with the sugar in a mixing bowl and mix.

Add one egg followed by 1-2 Tbsp of the flour, mix then add in the other egg and mix well.

Add in the mashed banana, mix again, followed by sieving in the remaining flour – mix again.

Fill your Loaf tin or smaller Cake tin,level it a bit and bake at 180 Degrees C. For 40 minutes.
After 40 min’s, place a sheet of Aluminium foil over the top, bring down to 150 Degrees C. And bake for a further 20 – 30 min’s.

Remove and check with a metal skewer or cutlery knife, stick it in and pull out fast, if a sticky substance shows then it is still a bit wet internally, cook for a further 7-10 min’s and check again, once your tool of choice comes out clean, then switch off and place somewhere to cool down for 10 mins before removing from the tin to cool down further.

The original recipe calls for a crazy 175g of Sugar! I have substantially reduced the amount of sugar needed and the result is a pleasant sweet loaf cake …

A week or o ago I made a Rhubarb and Custard Cake which was delish’, I hope to share this recipe with you soon as well, otherwise click on ”Recipes and Preserving” at the top of the page.

One great way to control Aphid in your garden or vegetable patch is to encourage Ladybirds, there are a couple methods and probably the best guaranteed one is to find trees / plants which aphid go for in serious numbers, Linden ‘Tilia cordata’ or Lime tree as it is wrongly known as is a great example, they get covered in Aphid every yea and subsequently attract ladybirds, you can collect ladybirds and their pupae into small bottles to spread around your garden or you could order them online! Another method is to research which umbellifer wild flowers are native locally and plant a mixture of them, umbellifers are plants which have flat clusters of small flowers which are often umbrella shaped, these usually attract aphid and result in Ladybird and hoverflies coming in to look for food! Often ants fight off the ladybirds, one method to distract the ants is to have a sugar water source nearby …

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Organic Pest Control by Encouraging Nature – Permaculture Allotment

Keep in mind, only release ladybirds in the evening and it helps to spray your plants with water as this will dissuade them from leaving right away however, if you place them in the day by hand directly onto a plant covered in Aphid, they usually start chomping immediately.

Store them in their bottle (with breathing holes and some leaves / twigs inside) inside the fridge if you cannot get them in place the same day …

The above photo is of two newly ‘hatched’ ladybirds hence why they are only orange at this stage, going back to my allotment the next day I saw the plant already had at least 50% less aphid just within 24 hours!

Today I had a short watering and planting session and can confirm that companion planting potatoes around a french bean tipi delivers good foliage and healthy plant results! If I remember, I will do my best to weigh the resulting potato harvest – Beans are natural Nitrogen Fixers and they help feed nearby plants in a symbiotic relationship (The potatoes will deliver a ground cover and reduce moisture loss).

Further, small frogs are leaving the pond and again I harvested 1 large and 3 smaller Courgettes (Zucchini) from only two dwarf bushes! I am on a mission this year to be sure to keep harvesting them when small to see how much yield I can get from those two plants, I have germinated two others to be able to possibly pickle their yield for winter use. The dry weather is actually a welcome! I have had far less slug and snail damage this year when compared to previous years …

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With the ground warming up around the UK and some parts passing their Last Frost date, we can all start sowing most of the crops now (There are still crops which can be sown from the March and April month lists)…

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Organic Sweetcorn can be grown in your own back Garden !

Outdoors:

  • Maincrop sowings of root crops – carrots, beetroot, leeks, radishes, turnips etc

  • French, runner and broad beans, mangetout & podding peas – sow in modules/pots if you have trouble with slugs/mice etc

  • All the brassicas can still be sown this month for overwintering – kale, brussels sprouts, purple sprouting broccoli, summer and winter cabbages, calabrese and cauliflowers

  • Leaf beets inclduing Swiss Chard

  • Herbs including parsley, coriander and others

  • Keep sowing salads, Much better a small sowing every 2-3 weeks than a large patch that bolts before you can eat it

  • Early sowings of fennel – if you have trouble with it bolting, wait until mid-June

  • Sweetcorn – but only sow direct if the weather, and soil, are warm, if not then start it off in modules / small pots.

  • Salad Onions

In trays or pots

  • Brassicas & Salad Onions (If you have slug / snail problems)

  • French, runner and broad beans, all types of peas

  • Sweetcorn

In trays or pots indoors

  • Courgettes, squashes, cucumbers and melons – ideally best sown by the end of May

In a polytunnel / greenhouse

  • Summer salads

  • Basil & coriander

  • Plant out summer crops (tomatoes, peppers etc) started indoors once you’re certain night time temperatures won’t fall too low

Maintenance

  • Application of compost onto growing beds if you haven’t done so already (Creating compost in less than one year is possible with the right amount of turning and moisture / urine addition)
  • Weeding will be a chore now, good strikes on sunny days with a hoe will be useful
  • emptying your composting area and bagging up the not-so-ready compost / mulch / mold to stack somewhere out of your way and to continue composting in the bags (I recommend you get hold of stronger bags such as old compost bags or builders rubble bags as they can last years – contact a local established gardening firm or landscaping company, they often need to dispose of hundreds of mulch bags after large landscaping jobs or annual mulch applications)
  • Slug / Snail / pest control including checking regularly for Aphid and Spider Mites etc.
  • If Green manures were sown at the right dates, you may need to start chopping and forking them in as you should be getting ready to start planting crops such as Tomatoes etc.

Note/s:

We have had a pretty bad start to Spring / Early Summer – it was only 8 degrees celcius on Monday and we have had hardly any good sunshine besides that one week where we had perhaps four good days? You may still need to sow indoors with this unpredicatable weather otherwise outdoors may be a gamble considering this year’s miserable start …

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The date of the 2018 Off-Grid festival has been set, ticket sales are on and the organisers boast a larger site with about 50% higher capacity.

Previous events were held at Goffin’s Land, Exeter in Devon, now they have moved to Tapeley park, Christie Estates, Instow in North Devon. Click here for a Map of the area.

I first stumbled upon this event last year a mere week or so before the actual event! No money and not having enough time to prepare, as well as not being able to request in such short notice for holiday leave put an end to the possibility of going. I made sure that 2018 will be the year to attend and it seems like I will definitely be able to go, even if only for a day using their cheaper day pass tickets…

It looks like a great event especially for Children, giving them the opportunity to spend quality, fun time away from their phones, computers and tablets.

Switch off, tune in, turn on …

 

The above video is footage from the 2016 event as a promotional for 2017’s event.

Below is more of the 2016 event and shows a little more including all of the entertainment side.

If one is interested in Off-Grid methods, even just out of interest sake or to learn a thing or two, take a look below at the extensive workshops list for each day from 2016, I can’t believe a 3 day event was just so jam packed ! ! !

 

The concept of Hugelkultur (Hugel Mound Growing) can basically be described as a self-composting bed or planting area (in the case of this article, in large pots). The gardener digs a shallow trench or pit and places logs, branches, sticks, twigs, brown leaves, nitrogen rich greens and or fresh manure, then tops these materials with the dug out earth and finally a decent layer of compost.

A good Hugel with large thick logs can be self-composting for anything up to 10 years. Read previous articles on traditional Hugels here Article 1 and Article 2.

Just the other day I realised that I can re-create the Hugel system but in large plastic planter pots, this will give you the benefit of Hugelkulturs without having to strain your back doing loads of digging!

Anyone taking on an uncultivated or fallow piece of land such as a disused Allotment Plot can always Sheet / Lasagna mulch a section, cover the result with thick impermeable black plastic sheet to kill off the perennial weeds and simply place Hugel Pots on top to ensure the land is still productive. Once you need to remove the sheet after a year and start using the ground space for planting, you can simply knock over the pots and empty the goodness to build up the humus / top layer!

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Hugelkultur Mound in Planter Pots

The general rule in terms of what can be grown on the Hugel Mound in year 1, are shallow rooted crops / plants such as various lettuces. Thereafter you can grow plants that require more nutrients and moisture and then finally on year 3  you can pretty much grow anything from Tomatoes to Pumpkins.

In the terms of the Hugel in a large pot, you can start the bottom layer either with composted or semi-composted wood chips (skip them and use soil if you have Slug / Snail problems), place a decent layer of soil (especially soil you wish to amend) on top of the latter with the Branch, Sticks, Twigs and cardboard / leaves as the carbon layer.

Follow on top with vegetables, fruit scraps, cut grass or fresh manure and then go on to adding the thick layer of soil / compost for growing in

(refer to image for general idea on layers, there are no specific rules but rather guidelines to follow) such as:

  1. Wood and wood chip need Nitrogen to break down, the plants you intend to grow need nitrogen too, the wood will suck this out of the soil and this is why we add manure or nitrogen rich fresh greens like veggie scraps and grass clippings / garden prunings, therefore, try to add as much green / manure / nitrogen rich material the more wood you have – greens decompose much quicker so stuff a lot in there.
  2. Compose the larger wood at the bottom and build up with smaller pieces until you reach brown leaves and cardboard this should ensure nice air spaces between are protected from being filled in by settling materials, these air spaces are important to ensure that the process does not become anaerobic – you could even start the logs on top of a 3-5cm thick layer of fresh grass clippings although this is not imperative.
  3. Intending on using this pot every year for the same purpose and do not intend on emptying it for a few years? then this is the time that you can use much thicker logs and branches in the bottom, if you want to empty the contents regularly (every 1 – 2 seasons) then it would be more beneficial to use thinner branches and sticks instead.
  4. Shallow rooted crops are mostly recommended in the first year however, you could easily use root crops such as carrots and parsnips provided you have a deeper layer of top soil / compost, remember that carrots and parsnips need nicely sieved compost / soil to prevent roots from ”forking”

One of the best ways to obtain a stock of Perennial Herbs such as Rosemary, Thyme, Oregano etc. from what I know is to pass by near the Vegetable section of a large Sainsbury’s Supermarket (Found on a metal shelf at the end of one of the aisles).

As long as you are okay with the idea that these plants are not of Organic cultivated stock and have likely been fed with a Chemical Fertiliser of sort, that this is a great way to save some money and increase your herb variety if you cannot or will not want to wait for seedlings to become decently sized.

They sell these in potted form and if I remember correctly, I got a Rosemary and Thyme for only £1 each which is a little more than buying a pack of freshly cut spigs! As Sainsburys is not actually my regular shop, I cannot say what other stock they have and which season they sell them in, my purchase was a last minute effort just before I finished my Herb Spiral on my allotment and my large Herb Planter at home in my kitchen garden. So far all of the plants purchased are still surviving and look healthy.

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Cheap / Decent Sized Perennial Herbs – £1 per pot!

As always, I like to encourage my followers or any visitors to try go from a mainly intensive annual crop production to a more relaxed approach which includes loads of Perennials, a system like this gives you more free time and could help you to produce a better Annual crop due to the fact that you can spend a little more time on them.

Starting off with Herbs is a great way to start up on a Perennial approach, species such as Terragon, Chinese Chives, Oregano, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme to name the most common are quite cold hardy and will live for more than two years. Most of those mentioned are very nice in herbal teas which have healing properties, they have more than one function other than for flavourful cooking!

Don’t get too hasty if you see a plant that seems to have died off, some plants such as the Terragon, Chives and Oregano will die off above the soil but new shoots will emerge from the soil in Spring!

To add to the above, I would recommend to plant the following in order to be able to create or at last add to salads during the summer months; French as well as Red-Veined Sorrel, Red Valerian (a common ornamental plant whose leaves are edible – not so great on their own but nice as a sandwich filler or added in a salad), Salad Burnet, Alchemilla (Lady’s Mantle – another very common ornamental – young leaves in a salad), Cedum (Ice Plant – quite common ornamental, also in salad) < All three of the latter mentioned Ornamentals are quite drought tolerant once established! The final one which I have yet to plant / try is Hablitzia taminoides, another salad plant which is said by Mandy at Incredible Vegetables to be happy growing in a shady corner in ones garden.

For those of you in the Tropics / Sub-Tropics where either all of most of the above-mentioned species will not grow well, please refer to the Plants For A Future Database if you would like to research Perennial Herbs and edible / medicinal plants suited to your climate and soil conditions etc.