Archive for the ‘Recipes & Preserving’ Category

I a finding myself unable to store any more Courgettes (Known in other countries as: Zucchini and even Baby Marrows). My fridge is FULL!
Everytime I either go into my garden or visit my allotment (every 2-3 days at this time of year), I am bringng in at least two decent sized Courgettes.

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Courgette (Zucchini) Cake Loaf

I am re-sharing an old recipe I added a while ago, this is the right time of the season to share this as most people are starting to wonder what else they can do with them …

Click here for an older post for the Courgette Loaf (more like a cake due to the higher sugar content). These are definitely great Healthy Alternatves in place of the everyday cakes we scoff down on a regular basis, the courgette gratings really moisten up the mix very well and make this a delicious tea time / coffee break snack.

Coming up and to look out for: Elderflower Wine Recipe, Elderberry Cordials and Syrups etc.

Today I noticed some fairly mature Elderberries around, with ofcourse, the wood pigeons hanging almost unpside down in a bat like pose, so get out soon and bet a batch, even if just to freeze for the meantime.

I am situated within the London microclimate and so, I think this is assurity thatthe Elderberries I have are ripening a few weeks earlier than in othe parts not only in England but other parts of the Northern Hemisphere …

Elderflower

Anyway, I have a few recipes coming up soon so pick, freeze etc. to keep them longer …

Hi everyone, this is just a quick update on my Dandelion Flower Wine (I made a batch around May when the flowers were still about in abundance). Click here for the recipe.

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Home Brewed Dandelion Flower Wine

I couldn’t resist and had one bottle about a month after first making the batch, the other three are now going to sit and mature – I keep reading that you should enjoy them starting around Christmas the same year onwards, I sincerely hope that I can leave one bottle to serve for a nice boiling hot day in Summer 2018 whilst next year’s batch is being bottled up and into storage!

I also have a previous post on Dandelion flower Jam, you will not regret making this at least once in your life!

The wine was quite nice, still a little strong with some fementation taking place so hopefully it will mellow down a bit in a few month’s from now, the alcohol content is surprisingly quite high.

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Dandelion flower Wine, bubbling away (2nd Week)

Keep an eye out, I will have a couple recipes for Elderflower wine and Elderberry Cordial coming up soon …

Here is the second recipe in my list of recipes using Dandelion Flowers, the rest of the plant is edible and I am now considering this plant to be a very important plant in Permaculture or any sustainable lifestyle environment. We are at the time of year when in various parts of the Northern Hemisphere, these plants are currently, have or will still come into flower (Here in the outskirts of London, we are currently seeing the last flowers appear and many have already become seed heads).

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In the last installment, I wrote on a very delicious Dandelion Flower Jam recipe which I highly recommend – it’s probably the best jam recipe I have ever used so far!

Before we get into the wine recipe, I must make it clear that this is the first time I am using this recipe or making the wine for that matter, I am currently halfway through my wine fermentation period and will not be able to give any taste results to my readers. This recipe comes to me from a reputable source and when I enquired with a contact of mine, it sounds very similar to the most commonly used Dandelion Flower Wine recipes out there, I am sharing this only because this is the time of year that the flowers are here, and we only have about a three week period before we don’t see them again for another year! Try it out, what have you got to lose?

Things you will most likely need to obtain / buy before hand:

  1. Fermenting container / Demi-john (1 Gal / 4.5 – 5 Ltr),
  2. Obtain container bottles for the final product (plastic is recommended over glass in case of continued fermentation gasses),
  3. Yeast sachet x1,
  4. Bubbler and Cork / Stopper,
  5. 4 Ltrs of Water (1 Gal USA) ,
  6. 2x Oranges,
  7. 2x Lemons,
  8. 1kg of Sugar (2lb 3oz),

Method:

  1. Put all of the Dendelion Flowers into a large pan / pot and pour over a full kettle (normally 1Ltr) of boiling water and leave for 24 hours,
  2. Strain the liquid out and don’t forget to compost the used flower heads,
  3. Add the juice of the lemons and oranges, the sugar and remaining water and stir until all mixed in sufficiently – place into your brewing container (not your final Demi-john – I used a 5Ltr plastic bottle),
  4. Add your yeast, cover with a cloth and leave in this container for a further 24 hours,
  5. Pour into your Demi-john and place the bubbler (Airlock), leave in a dark cool cupboard / basement etc. for a minimum of one month,
  6. Pour into our storage bottles – consume chilled

If you are in the Northern Hemisphere then some of you may still either be waiting for Dandelions to flower or may be seeing the last flowers become seed heads, for those lucky enough, you still have time to collect the flowers for the following Recipes.

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Once you start to see the flowers appearing, a good rule-of-thumb is to keep in mind that on average, you only have a 3 week window to pick and use for your recipes, so that means multiple trips if you want to follow more than one recipe.

This was the first time I have used Dandelion for culinary purposes and started first with the Jam Recipe:

What’s Needed:

  1. A grocery store shopping bag Half Full of Dandelion flowers,
  2. 3 x cooking apples, peeled, cored and chopped,
  3. 3x squeezed lemons,
  4. 600ml boiling water,
  5. 725gm jam sugar.

Method:

  1. Put the Chopped apples and around 3/4ths of the flower heads into a pan with the hot water and simmer for 10 minutes,
  2. After 10 minutes, strain the remaining results through a sieve or similar and push as much pulp through as possible using a spoon,
  3. Add the strained liquid back into your pan together with the lemon juice and sugar,
  4. Dissolve the sugar by cooking on low heat and stirring regularly, add the rest of the dandelion heads (petals only, cut off the green parts with scissors),
  5. Boil on high heat until you reach the setting point (Click here to find out how to find your setting point in jam making),
  6. Ladle into your prepared jars, this recipe made me 3 standard honey jars and 2 smaller speciality hex jars I bought online.

I really, really like the end product! This jam is delish and makes the harvesting well worth it in my opinion, this is a plant that should not be killed off and considered a weed, every part of this plant is edible and it is a perennial!
– Jeff Permie

In the coming days, I will post a Dandelion Wine Recipe, I am currently fermenting my first ever batch of this wine and so cannot give you full information right through to the taste of the end product, I am halfway through the fermenting period and will be bottling the product up in another two weeks. I feel like sharing this recipe because of the fact that some readers may still be able to harvest the flower heads, this is a proven and common recipe and I feel that it will definitely be worth it …

Recently I added a recipe on making your own plum Compote, here is the very simple recipe on serving the compote with Natural Yogurt and some other bits …
This recipe can be made in a Vegan / dairy Free way by using Soya based Yogurts

Ingredients:

  1. Home made Compote,
  2. Natural non flavoured Organic Yogurt,
  3. Honey,
  4. Banana,
  5. mixed Crushed Nuts.

Method:

 

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Step 1: Place about 2-3 Tablespoons of your Compote into the bottom of a globe glass such as a wine glass etc. Top the latter with a few Tablespoons of Natural Yogurt then finally top with a tablespoon or so of more Compote.

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Step 2: Top the second layer of Compote with a layer of Banana Slices

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Step 3: Top the Banana Slices with the final layer of Natural Yogurt, then you can pour a little amount of honey followed by the Crushed Mixed Nuts

Step 4: Eat !

Click Here for the article on how to Make Your Own Plum Compote

One trending recipe that I have come across online quite a lot recently is the Sweet Potato toast recipe, here is my own personal toppings recipe and I also have some very important safety advice based on some personal experience – lets just say, luckily I was in the kitchen at that time!

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Jeff’s Sweet Potato Toast Toppings Recipe

The general method to make the toast:

  1. Check the inside of your toaster, get any bread crumbs out from the bottom (not only the tray, try get as much out as possible),
  2. Peel your Potato (If organic, skip this part),
  3. Slice the potato lengthwise to the thickness of around 8mm to a maximum of 10mm,
  4. Place the slices in the toaster and set the toaster to half the maximum time (be careful the first time you do this!) the potato toast takes longer than bread to make toast and each toaster is different, you really need to do this a few times to be able to get to know your toaster to be able to re-create this recipe over and over with confidence,
  5. Once the toast pops out, use tongs to check, it is likely that it will need to be given another round in the toaster, the toast should become flexible and the skin should start forming ”bubbles” which also start going brown / black – then you know it is ready

NOTE: Regarding step 1, any old collated bread crumbs inside your toaster Can Set On Fire! This happened to me! The reason why is because when making Sweet Potato Toast, we are keeping the toaster on for such a longer time than Bread Toast, which can cause the crumbs to finally get hot enough to catch on fire.
I was in the kitchen and noticed it right away, the fire was strong enough to have actually made the toaster itself catch fire then subsequently the chipboard counter top and pretty much most of the kitchen!! Be Careful

Jeff’s Unique Sweet Potato Toast Topping:

Ingredients:

  1. Hoummous,
  2. Fresh Green Olives,
  3. Red Pesto,

Method:

  1. Spread the Red Pesto on the slice,
  2. Top this with 3-4 dollops of Hoummous using a teaspoon,
  3. Place a few half sliced Green Olives between the Hoummous Dollops,
  4. Eat !

There are quite a few topping recipes online, most of them are Avocado based which I didn’t have any at the time of experimenting with Sweet Potato Toast – I am really quite chuffed with that otherwise I would not have stumbled upon this really nice combination.

I also tried Hoummous only with Green Olives, this does suffice but is definitely not as tasty as with the Pesto.

If you come up with your own recipe, please do come here and comment / share (Remember, you Do Not need a wordpress account to comment on my blog, guests can comment too)