Archive for the ‘Permaculture system’ Category

Late Summer / Early Autumn is the best time to start gathering the materials you need for your planned Hugel Bed / Mound, many Herbaceous plants which can be used in conjunction with the wood logs, branches and sticks are now ready to be chopped down and composted or used in another way. Autumn / Winter is the preferred time her in the UK to create your Hugelkultur mounds mainly due to the need for the wet season to soak the beds, the buried logs will soak up the winter rains for months until the upcoming growing season.

Two pieces of advice I can definitely lecture on about in this article to ensure a successful Hugel Project are;
1: Ensure Air Spaces inside the mound and
2: Add lots of Nitrogen rich Biomass internally to offset the nitrogen locking that the logs will create during decomposition

Air Spaces:
Although there are guaranteed to be air spaces between the logs and branches / sticks, I have found that rain and the settling down of the materials can cause these spaces to fill in, often causing or risking an anaerobic result – go explore your garden or any other garden you have access to (You may even be able to make a deal with a local gardening company – they could leave a bag of said such materials for you outside one of their customers properties so as long as you collect the bag and not leave unwanted contents at the site!) remember, you can always bargain that most companies have to pay to dump their waste at commercial specialist dumps, remind them that you are helping them reduce the need to do so, in most cases they will still have charged their customers to ”remove” the waste even though you took if off of their hands, the customer will inevitably still be charged for it being dumped.

There are many herbaceous plant species which have a hollow stem and need cutting down in Autumn, cut these stems into pieces which you will spread around and in between your logs at different levels to ensure small air cavities will remain. Cedums, Ornamental Globe Artichokes, Jerusalem Artichokes (Sunchokes), Young Bamboo (and old), some Hydrangea varieties and many more have hollow cavity stems which harden enough when dry to be used in this case.

Then there is dry hard leaf ”garden waste” which takes ages to decompose, these are leaves from shrubs and trees which are more on a glossy and hard / stiff texture than a soft / decidious and most likely in all cases, evergreen. Three options I have from the top of my head as examples are the leaves of ‘Magnolia Grandeflora’, The climber ‘Clematis Armandii’ , the Loquat ‘Eribotrya japonica’ Fruit Tree, Some Rhododendrons (look for the large leaved varieties) and Laurels. We have found that most of these leaves can take up to two years in an unturned / undisturbed compost pile to break down, they maintain their structure even when pressed down so they are perfect for maintaining air spaces / gaps internally within the Hugel Bed / Mound! Practically any glossy leaved plant / shrub / tree will do but the larger and dryer – the better!
In fact, a couple of these Tree / Shrub leaves will actualy curl up to form a cilyndrical tube shape with an internal hollow gap, when pressed these are strong and bounce back right away once released.

Nitrogen Rich Biomass:
Probably one of the best options are fresh grass clippings from your lawn mowing or that of a neighbour / friend. You can even clip your grass at your home twice a week for the last 3 or so weeks of Summer, keep these clippings aside in a breathable bag until ready to add into the Hugel Bed – if you obtain clippings over several weeks, you Will need to add additional fresh greens into the mix to compenate lost nitrogen.
Horse Manure is also a great option but I would suggest it be used more as an addition to fresh green waste rather than 100% of the nitrogen source
The not-so-popular option amongst people new to Permaculture, is human Urine, which has a good nitrogen content and is often used diluted 1 part to 10 in early season liquid feed for plants
If you plan on lets say December being your target month for getting your Hugel project started, I would advise Growing a patch of Broad or Field bean green manure from Late August / Early September – these will be ready for chopping down and adding into your bed around and amongst the logs as the fresh greens instead of grass clippings which won’t be available during that month anyway

Further Reading: Click Here for an article on the step-by-step making of a Hugelkultur Mound / Bed

In this video, the land owner describes the soil / subterrenian water issues, annual rainfall and family requirement calculations for an off grid system – how they are resolved, water storage and use, solar heating, solar water pumping, indigenous plants – as well as liquid fertilising – this is an almost off-grid Urban Permaculture Homestead and some things can be learned in this video tour.
I didn’t note any mentioned plans for animal keeping or even bees for that matter so it would be interesting to catch an update of the system and how it has changed or improved over the last few years since 2014…

I would reccommend that the land owner in this case to take a look into studying Holzer Permaculture specifically in Water Retention, this will help solve his water storage / retention issues.

The video is around 8 min’s and there are good ideas to follow from watching …

And so¬†I finally get around to posting ”what’s going on” photo’s of both my Allotment and Garden …

I love bees, but unfortunately with this year’s cool weather, I haven’t been able to get a nice photo yet compared with previous years, I do have a frog though ūüėČ

Click on each picture below for a larger image of such

 

Wildlife have increased both on the Allotment and Garden, mainly due to the added varieties of plants as well as ponds on both sites, I can’t stress enough how important a pond is, even if you just get a small container and place it in a hole with a few plants inside, it will go a long way to help the local ecosystem, not only that but can also create a Micro Climate which you can take advantage of in terms of Plant Variety and options …

Tadpoles are, Still Tadpoles! …¬†in the small pond at home, I’m leaning towards that maybe they don’t have as much food due to the pond size compared with the Allotment, so I’ve made a mental note to throw in a few more ”accidentally stepped on” slugs to help them along …

I’m growing Achocha for the first time this year, they are climbers so they are growing amongst the Pumpkins on the large trellis, they are related to the famous ‘Exploding Cucumber’ but the reason why I’m growing them is I feel like giving up on Peppers, the slugs are too Rambo here and this variety is said to taste like Green Peppers when fried – they are also a vine plant so a bit out of reach for the slugs.

The Japanese ‘Hokkaido’ Pumpkin are said to be one of the easiest Heritage (Heirloom) pumpkins to grow in the UK climate, are quite prolific and highly recommended as well as the Pumpkin Masque De Province.

I chopped down my Bocking 14 Comfrey literally 3 – 4 weeks ago and already have a plant almost two thirds back to the original size! You definitely need to divide the roots every year after the second year onwards … the crowns sell for reasonable money online so keep that in mind! I am pondering opening an online shop here, this will be something on offer if I go ahead with the idea.

Above are the photo’s from the Allotment plot, starting with a nice sunrise sometime perhaps after 6am? Once cloud, wow, amazing for the UK skyline eh?

The wildflower bed is¬†doing better now than I had expected (I really waited very late to buy and sow a pack on that dedicated bed) luckily all worked out fine, I suspect maybe less than half of the varieties mentioned on the seed pack germinated so I was quite happy with what came out. The Borage flowers are beautiful aren’t they? No wonder they are used in salads for a visual touch!

The¬†Pumpkin¬†is another French variety¬†Galeuse d’Eysines which I had some reasonable success with last year, it climbs well and does pretty good in storage

I placed Marigolds ‘Tagetes’ too late ( well I discovered that Marigolds really should be the First plant you germinate before you start sowing vegetable seeds – this is a personal observation, but I bet not my own) and hence lost a Pumpkin and Courgette plant to slugs, the other marigolds under my Achocha plants almost got completely decimated (that’s their purpose anyway) but are coming back to life now, their new purpose is ornamental¬†to brighten up the plot¬†and finally to provide me with seed for next year

The Water Mint ‘Mentha Aquatica’ are now flowering, they are insect / Bee beneficial and if you look closely in the photo, you can see¬†a resident Frog¬†on the left near the flower right in the emergence zone at the water line.

Till the next Garden / Allotment update – most likely a Harvest Update but there might be more ”mid summer” if we suddenly get good hot weather so the plants can get a boost

Here we have proof that the Forest Gardening method Does in fact work despite the skepticism that we Permies will inevitable experience from traditional ”Horticultural / Mono-cultural Society” types, in this 5 minute, well narrated and presented video, the land owner discusses his land and the project how it has come on since 1994.
This is a great video to watch to be able to understand the Forest Garden concept.


The main article where I came across this video is Here on the Permaculture News site, and below I have added a few images of the 7 basic layers of the Forest Garden concept:

7 layers

7 Layers of the Food Forest in Permaculture

Slide3-640x480

A Food Forest incorporating a Hugel / Swale combination

 

I have another Video Home tour, this one is from Johannesburg South Africa (I chose to find another one from this city as my previous one has had the video removed or deleted and I cannot find another copy).

This one is particularly exciting as he goes through his property’s greywater recycling system/s, bio digester, bio diesel refinery, whole garden and fruit trees including a little bit on tree grafting. This all is in a Townhouse Complex to top it off!
Enjoy the video and Happy Holidays to us Unfortunate ones who still have to work full time for a living! ….

As always, I am trying to keep my cool followers up to date with regular ”Permaculture Site Tours” from all over the world! I am merely hoping to show that A: Permaculture is global and growing and B: hoping to inspire others when they see a great system somewhere in their country or city / town!

Today’s video tour is of a front garden in Denver Colorado USA, It really is quite a beautiful garden and system especially all of the colours and attention paid to helping out the pollinators!

Thanks for stopping by and enjoy the video …

I’m glad I re-stumbled upon this video of the Dervaes Family in the US, The basic plot is that their father became quite dissatisfied with the way things were going in the food industry when he found out that the tortilla wraps he gave his children for a meal were being recalled due to being ”accidentally” made using GMO Corn.
He then began back garden growing which turned eventually into a complete package including animals, sustainable fuel mixing (Bio fuel), bee keeping, selling their produce to local restaurants etc. and earning $20,000 per year from the extras, after watching this, feel free to go stare at your boring lawn! …

Must see for some much needed Inspiration!