Archive for the ‘Home Grown’ Category

Hi everyone, this has already been posted in March but I’m posting again because, although the April sowing calendar is the same for March and they share the same crops, now more crops can be direct sown outdoors.

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Cucumber Seedlings – Organic Permaculture

So here it is, just remember next year if you use my site as a reminder of what and when to sow, that March and April are the same however, a good vegetable book is still recommended as sometimes you might find a book that is more relevant to your country / area – we are in the UK so this advice can work in similar northern hemispheric climates however, the timings might be slightly different.

April Sowing Calendar, Click Here

Regarding my own personal experience this very gloomy and wet 2018 Spring, I have had okay results in seed sowing but Onions have had a 50% or so failure rate, Marigolds have so far had 100% failure including newer seed …

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Below is a list of what can be sown indoors, outdoors or in greenhouses and polytunnels during the months of March and April, this is for the UK / British Climate but can still be relevant in some other parts of the Northern Hemisphere

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During April 2017 we had a last minute frost which decimated at least 40% of my seedlings in the Polytunnel on the allotment, even though I got in there after work to shut the door and ventilation – my mistake was when I gave them a quick drink (this froze and killed them).

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Between Middle of March and April, most of your Spring sowings should have been started. Of-course it also depends on where exactly you live, but this is the average dateline for most of Britain.

Outside (depending on weather and soil conditions)

  • Root crops such as carrrots, parsnips, beetroot and turnips
  • Mangetout & podding peas & broad beans – probably better started indoors to avoid pests
  • The first sowings of summer salads including lettuces,radishes, cress, endive, & rocket,
  • Brassica crops for eating this summer & also through into the winter – kale, brussels sprouts, purple sprouting broccoli, summer and (early) winter cabbages,  calabrese and cauliflowers
  • Leaf Beets as well as swiss chard
  • Leeks
  • Radishes and spring onions
  • Some Green Manures are good to scatter sow now so they can be ‘chop n’ dropped’ in time for Summer plants such as Pumpkins, Squashes and Tomatoes when they need planting

Indoors

  • If you have slug or weed problems, then you may find all of the brassica crops, leeks and salads do better started in trays/modules and then planted out when they are better able to withstand them.
  • Similarly broad beans and peas may have to be started indoors if you have trouble with mice
  • Any companion / sacrificial plants such as Marigolds,

In trays or pots somewhere warm (germinator/warm airing cupboard etc).           Bear in mind that they will need somewhere warm & light to grow on

  • Tomatoes, peppers and aubergines, ideally by the end of March.
  • Celery/celeriac (again need heat to germinate)
  • Courgettes, squashes, cucumbers and melons (but not too early, or they will get too large before the weather is good enough for them to go outside)

In a greenhouse / polytunnel in the ground

  • Summer salads
  • French beans for an early crop
  • Herbs such as coriander, basil & parsley

Remember, to come back to this page easily you can just click on the ‘Monthly Sowing Calendar’ tab on the home screen.

 

 

I have been making Apple Cider (even a semi Pear Cider) and Cider Vinegar using a very very very veeerrrry simple recipe now for 3 years running, so simple in fact that you Do Not Need a Fruit Press!

Young Organic Apple Jonagold on an urban Permaculture Farm

Organically Grown Jonagold Apples – Cider & Vinegar Making

What you need is: Apples, Water, Container/s (5ltr / 1 Gal), Sugar (1 Cup), Knife with Chopping board … and Time – That’s It!

What I recommend is to get hold of a few different varieties of apple (even some pears), try your best not to use only one apple variety.

Click the Link Here for the full recipe with explanation between Cider only and Cider Vinegar as the final result.

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Mandy and her partner run a section of a cooperatively bought piece of land and run their Incredible Vegetables enterprise, as much as I would like to explain some details about their project, I will most likely be mirroring exactly what is already in the interview. Here are a few previous posts (Post 1) & (Post 2) regarding Incredible Vegetables for those who haven’t seen them yet.

What was your inspiration to create your enterprise? did you already have this in mind when you obtained your little strip of land or was it later on?

We didn’t have an enterprise in mind when we first obtained the land. We wanted to be self sufficient in vegetables, that was our main priority. The enterprise essentially developed from sharing what we were doing on social media and people starting asking us about the plants we were growing. There is such an interest in perennial vegetables that once people heard we were experimenting with such plants we had a huge number of requests. We thought why don’t we try and grow and supply a few of the harder to find edible perennials? It all developed from there and Incredible Vegetables was launched!

What is your reason for concentrating on unusual / bizzarre vegs and edible plants?

We spent many years as  ‘regular’ growers. By that I mean growing stuff in the back garden, including all the things you would normally find in a vegetable garden. We thought there must be more to eat and grow and there must be a different way of doing it. There are a myriad of edimentals and perennial vegetables out there and once you start researching them it is pretty hard to stop. Also we wanted to move away from enormous amount of work that annual growing involves.
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Today whilst trying to get a list of Perennial Herbs which are good in most Temperate Climates (mainly for the UK climate due to locality) I came across this extensive list that is short in descriptions, to the point and advises whether the plant is annual, biennial or perennial.

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I’m just sharing the link below for anyone interested, their organisation has morals too, they have a pledge to be 100% peat free in their business – take a quick read on the peat free page, it is quite interesting and might make you think twice when buying compost again. This list is a great reference you could use to decide which herbs to obtain, further research for each plant’s specific requirements is likely to be needed once you have selected species and varieties.

http://www.devongrown.co.uk/herb-list.html

There is this nice little Permaculture Farm in a very nice rural setting in farmlands in New Zealand, in this video the owner goes through many aspects from Yields, earnings from yield (per Kilo), Climate and changes / difficulties. There is even quite a detailed part on Micro green production. Their business design is on High Value crops and he explains how he even gets ahead of monoculture / large scale industrial type farmers by having some crops such as Aubergine (Eggplant / Brinjal) available as far as Two Months ahead which enables him to increase the price of the first two months charge by up to NZD 4.00 Per Kilo above the seasonal rate!

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Micro Greens mass production in a Permaculture system

Take a look at the Aubergine bed and its width / length, he claims that he made NZD 1,600 in one season from that bed alone!

Further discussions include the benefits and huge relief they had when obtaining a cooler for their salads to increase storage time and so on.

They have had a good crop of Strawberries this year with around 400 Kilograms harvested and sold for profit from the bed next to the large polytunnel (above vide and below image).

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Huge Strawberry Harvest on a Permaculture Farm

Wouldn’t you agree ?

Just click on each image above to view in a larger window.