Archive for the ‘Europe’ Category

I came across this festival via a pamphlet I got at the London Permaculture Festival last week and decided to help promote it, unfortunately the date of the event is just next week and is far too late for me to be able to even attampt to attend. I will now hopefully be able to book it for next year if possible …

This years event will be held between Thursday 10th to Saturday 13th of August 2017 and you can still book tickets on their website.

o g f 2017 ao g f 2017

Watching the video (3.5 mins long) this is definitely an event which is worthwhile to go to, I’m sadly going to miss the opportunity this year, it looks excellent especially for kids!

For those who are unable to watch the video or stream it for some reason, the following are some of the events and things to do at the festival based on last year’s video:

  • Archery,
  • Off Grid College,
  • Crafts and Tech area,
  • Well Being Area,
  • The Wildwood,
  • Off Grid Kids Area,
  • Live Music Barn,
  • Eco Build Demos
  • Organic Food and Drink,
  • Family Camping.

Another World Is Possible

Off Grid Festival Website (Click Here).

Other courses / talks on offer are:

New Economy – Permaculture – Eco-Build – 12v Technology (solar / wind power) – Bushcraft – Growing Food – Low-Impact Living – Land – Social Enterprise – Community Housing – Energy – Forest School – Conflict Resolution – Foraging & Wild Medicine – Yoga – Dance & Meditaion

Honestly, I’m contemplating faking a semi serious illness to get off from work now …. ๐Ÿ™‚

Lon Perm Fest 17 banner

London Permaculture Festival 2017

We have 15 days left for the London Permaculture Festival of 2017, For full details (opening times, address, entrance fees etc. Please Click Here on the previous post).

My personal three favourite attractions at the event are The Rare Plant Nursery, The book store and the Workshops.

They have updated the itineary for the Festival and the Workshops which are free (part of the entrance fee) which you can attend, as follows:

Workshops in 2017 include:

  • Maddy Harland: Climate change, carbon sequestering and restoring ecosystems
  • Mark Ridsdill Smith: Growing food without a garden โ€“ the six secrets to success in container growing
  • Andy Goldring: The Thriving Communities project โ€“ raising funds and support to tackle disadvantage across the UK with permaculture
  • Tomas Remiarz: Forest gardening in practice for homes, communities and enterprises
  • Kevin Mascarenhas: Business as a living system inspired by natural patterns
  • Mary Rawlinson: Building with Straw Bales
  • Robin Grey & Rachel Rose Reid: A music, poetry and storytelling circle on land and housing rights from the Tree Acres and a Cow team
  • Alex Laird: Living medicine: Self care with food & herbs
  • Ben Cullen: OLIO free app โ€“ Join the food sharing revolution!
  • Mich Thill: Permaculture livelihood
  • Chloe Anthony: Introduction to permaculture as a design system
  • Sue Amos: Composting for urban gardeners
  • Cecilia Litvinoff & Pamela Adams: Making permakids green, organic and fearless
  • Nat Mady: Introduction to permaculture
  • Les Moore: Sociocracy
  • Randy Mayers: Introduction to permaculture
  • Ian Westmoreland: Making your own solar panels
  • Mary Spyrou: Natural dyeing
  • Coco: Tyre Furniture Skills
  • Kamal Simpson: Nature storytelling
  • Cafe Cairo at the Festival
  • Garden tours of Cecil Sharp House Permaculture Learning and Demonstration garden
  • Permablitz London Live!
  • Families at the Festival
    • Face painting
    • Nature storytelling
    • Garden trail
    • Felting
    • Nature art
    • Meet the hens
    • Wriggly worms
    • Mini beasts
    • and much more!

We are approaching the point where the average Last Frost Date for our respective regions / areas will pass and we can start placing more sensetive plants outdoors for hardening in Polytunnels and greenhouses etc.

Here is a great image you can refer to, it is a zoomed out map of the UK with coloured areas indicating temperatre changes and the subsequent expected annual last frost date.

Last Frost Map PNG 1

Whilst this map is useful in checking your general area, you may want to zoom in and confirm exactly where your land sits, on This Site (< Click) you can zoom in further and also click on either the name where you live or another local name which is listed…

March and April both have basically the same crops that need sowing and are concidered shared months, it really all depends on your location, if you are in a zone in your country which is warmer compared to other parts, then it is likely that you can sow in March as opposed to your country men and women in colder areas …

purple beans

Outdoors (depending on weather and soil conditions)

  • Root crops including the first sowings of carrrots, parsnips, beetroot & turnips,

  • Mangetout & podding peas, also broad beans – although there’s less chance of pest problems if started in trays rather than right in the beds / ground

  • The first sets of summer salads such as lettuces, rocket, radishes, endive & cress,

  • Brassica crops for eating this summer & also through into the winter โ€“ kale, summer and (early) winter cabbages, brussels sprouts, purple sprouting broccoli, calabrese and cauliflowers

  • Swiss chard & leaf beet

  • Spring onions
    Leeks

In trays or pots (Outdoors)

  • If you have slug or weed problems, then you may find all of the brassica crops, leeks and salads do better started in trays/modules and then planted out when they are better able to withstand them.

  • Similarly broad beans and peas may have to be started indoors if you have trouble with mice

Indoors somewhere warm (germinator / good windowsill close to a heater)

  • Tomatoes, peppers and aubergines, ideally by the end of March.

  • Celery/celeriac (again need heat to germinate)

  • Courgettes, squashes, cucumbers and melons (but not too early, or they will get too large before the weather is good enough for them to go outside)

In a polytunnel / greenhouse direct into the border or pots

  • Summer salads

  • French beans for an early crop

  • Herbs such as basil, coriander & parsley

 

Happy Sowing! …..

Woodchip is a great soil amendment and adds nutrients into the soil slowly, I have observably proven this to myself last year on my Allotment where I stashed a few wheelbarrows of woodchip on a section of my plot because otherwise the communal woodchip would likely have been finished by the time I needed some.
Once I dug my pond out, I covered the mound of woodchip with the soil from within the pond, about 6 months later I finally started a new project in the place of the mound of soil where I discovered the very well composted woodchip and noticed when digging that the topsoil layer was darker within a few inches under the topsoil line, when I compared this to a section just a meter away, the soil was lightly coloured and only darker very close to the surface line…

Below is a great video proving and showing from day one to 8 years on, the soil is even dug down seriously deep to prove how far the amendment reached until the soil quality becomes poor again.

 

Important Note: If you obtain free woodchip from your local Tree Surgeons, always ask what tree/s were chipped! Basically, Broad Leaf are usually Alkaline or Neutral PH (Oak is Acidic though) and Coniferous are Acidic PH, So use Conifer Woodchip for pathways as less weeds will germinate amongst the mature rotting chips as well as a mulch for Acid loving plants like strawberries and Blueberries. Use the Broad Leaf for your beds and as a soil amender!

Video courtesy of youtube channel OneYardRevolution

I have been meaning to do this for ages and here it finally is, I have a dedicated page with a calendar for seed sowing and planting.
Click Here to jump straight to it, but keep in mind it is a page tab at the top of the screen near the ”About Growingarden” tab.

seasonal

Soon I will update the other months such as March onwards so you can order your seeds in advance and also prepare / think how you would like to arrange your garden design this year.
Keep in mind, newer concepts like Companion Planting, Planting for wildlife especially Pollinators etc. Some herbs are pungeant, they release off strong odours which repel and confuse pests.

Remember, to keep things interesting, think what did not work so well last year and apply one of the Permaculture Principles ”The Problem is the Solution”- in other words you can fix a problem by turning it into a solution and working with it instead of against.
For an off -the-head example: If you have had problems with slugs and no matter what you do, their numbers never drop and the population keeps staying high, get a duck or two! Ducks love them and you will be introducing a pest controller into your system which will produce eggs and even meat if you wish, lets not forget they also have a built in rear compost spreader as well! ๐Ÿ˜‰

This Seasonal Growing Calendar is only valid for Cold Weatherย  / Temperate Climates such as in the Northern Hemisphere / Europe/UK where frosts are expected during winter.

There a are a number of plants due for sowing in February, as well as some which show up in the Janurary list, these too can still be sown now …

baby-carrots

Young Carrots Growing In A Container

Indoors:

  • Round Seeded Peas (See explanation / description in January Sowing Calendar – Click Here),
  • Aubergines, Tomatoes and Peppers (Especially Aubergines, these plants really do need a good early start in order to have a chance of baring fruit in our climate), Peppers take long to germinate (Sometimes almost a month so going by what a general seed pack says will almost always spell disater) and Tomatoes can always do with an earlier start – just be sure to have a nice indoor spot for them to grow on in whilst waiting for the last frost date,

Outside (Polytunnel or Green house):

  • Oriental Greens and Winter Lettuce Varieties again for planting in March, (See varieties list in the January Sowing Calendar),
  • If you are in a warmer part of the country, Carrots can be sown inside Greenhouses and Polytunnels to produce an earleir Crop – you can consider these ‘Early First Earlies!’
    NOTE: I would still reccommend experimenting though, I have some carrots which were sown late outdoors with no cover at all and I am in what is considered a ”warmer part of the ountry” these Carrots have survived well on a windy site without top cover, albeit looking worse for wear, they are alive and will definitely improve when the weather gets better