Stacking Functions in Permaculture – a short example

Posted: August 4, 2018 in Awareness & Information, Composting, Permaculture Principles and Techniques, Soil Structure and Fixing, Stacking

In Permaculture practice often ‘Stacking Functions’ is something one hears from time-to-time, here is a very brief example of Stacking something to form more than one function or purpose …

Today I got hold of dried Cordyline Leaves and I can tell from past experience that once composted, you should get a very nice textured compost that has good structure (with the only downside being time of composting). The plan was only to chop them up and add them into my 4 compost bins but I also decided to place some in heavy duty bags such as re-used compost bags and let them to sit out of sight (perhaps behind a shed?) and compost down on their own, out of the way until needed.

Organic Compost from Cordyline Leaves

Organic Compost from Cordyline Leaves

The solution to try get them a bit of a kick start was to throw them into a bucket of water that has a handfull or so of Chicken Manure Pellets pre-mixed in and let to soak up for 24-48 hours.

Step two is merely throwing the amount of chopped and soaked leaves required to fill Half of the bag and further pack the other half of the bag with a dry bunch of the leaves to help soak up any excess moisture, then puncture some holes in the bag (so that worms can get in) and pack the bag away until needed.

Second Function =

now instead of just pouring out the leftover liquid from the bucket randomly into a bed somewhere or into a drain, you will make the effort to use it diluted as a plant feed in your garden as Chicken Manure is high in Nitrogen…

Another quick example is with plants, the Elaeagnus umbellata’ (Autumn Olive) is a shrub which is common in Permaculture Food Forest design guilds, the plant is deciduous (leaves fall in winter so can be used to provide shade in summer and allow light to penetrate in winter), it is a Nitrogen fixer, which means it is able to provide extra nitrogen naturally to any neighbouring plants thereby helping to support them in a symbiotic system, the final benefit is that it also provides a useful delicious berry in Summer  / Autumn.

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